Saturday, August 1, 2015

HOLA Member Bochinche

Bochinche refers to “gossip”. In this sense, we use it to mention HOLA members or Friends of HOLA who are getting acting, performance or similarly artistic gigs and/or recognition in the media. The names of HOLA members and Friends of HOLA are listed below in boldface. To see what other HOLA members are doing currently, click here.

2015 HOLA Awards recipient Héctor Luis Rivera, shown at rightwrote his latest "Chismorreo" column for his blog Héctor Luis Sin Censura. He mentions the latest and upcoming projects for several HOLA members, including Edison Carrera, 2015 HOLA Awards recipient Julio Ortega, José Sepúlveda, Manuel A. Morán, 2015 HOLA Awards recipient Sebastian Stimman, Edna Lee Figueroa, and A.B. Lugo. To read the blog, which is in Spanish, click here.

Caridad de la Luz (also known by her nom de poésie et de musique La Bruja) will be performing at the Free Music & A Movie event, sponsored by the New York Restoration Project (NYRP). The event will take place on Saturday, August 1, 2015 at the NYRP Wills Avenue Community Garden, located in the Mott Haven neighborhood of the South Bronx.

Jason Torres, shown at left, booked a lead role in the short film Another Creep (written and directed by Elroy Martínez). In addition, he will also be featured as Jack in the opening webisode of the third season of the webseries "The Wrong One" (written by Bruce Wabbit and directed by Chris Johnson).

Mónica Delgado booked a voiceover for MetaHealth for a commercial featuring Michael Strahan.

If you are an HOLA member or a Friend of HOLA and want to submit a bochinche item, send us an e-mail. If you live in the New York metropolitan area and want to be an HOLA member, why not join? If you live outside the New York metropolitan area and want to be an HOLA member, you can find out more information on how to do so, by clicking here. If you are not a Friend of HOLA, why not become one? 

Friday, July 31, 2015

Banner Ads Now Available on HOLA Website

Wanna promote your upcoming stage production? Your upcoming film screening? Your upcoming special event?

HOLA members often get publicity in our Members in Performance page, but what if you could promote on our main homepage, or in our directory (The HOLA Pages), where more people can see your ad?

What if you had a project with no HOLA members that you wanted to promote?

What if you wanted to promote something that wasn’t a show (like your production company itself or a new website)?

Now you can do so by BUYING A BANNER AD on the HOLA website.

Banner ads come in half-page and full-page sizes and can be on the HOLA website for one week, two weeks, three weeks or a whole month. HOLA can also link your ad to a particular website at no additional cost.

Prices on the banner ads are affordable. Also, not-for-profit organizations receive a 10% discount on ad prices.

The HOLA website receives thousands of visits each month. The HOLA website is viewed by many professionals in the industry and is a unique way of reaching the Latino/Hispanic and mainstream audiences, which make buying a banner ad a smart investment for you.

Wanna buy a banner ad? Call (212) 253-1015 or (888) 624-HOLA or e-mail us for prices and ad dimensions.

HOLA Regional Membership Available For Those Outside New York Metropolitan Area

If you are an actor who lives in an area of the U.S. outside of the New York metropolitan area, New Jersey or Connecticut (HOLA's programming and administrative headquarters region), HOLA is proud to announce its Regional Membership level - for only $65 (versus a $125 regular NYC region membership price) for one full year!

As an HOLA Regional Member, you'll be entitled to the following member benefits:

• Your headshot, resume, reel and voiceover demo*  showcased on the HOLA Pages, the internet's only concentrated source of Latino acting talent. The directory is a trusted resource for casting directors, producers and talent agents receiving, on average, over 5,000 visits per month. (* There is an additional charge 
of $15 for adding your voiceover demo.)

• Your performances listed and promoted via HOLA's website and social media pages (Facebook and Twitter) that reaches thousands of people in the entertainment industry.

• Casting notices that will alert you to employment opportunities tailored to the Latino actor.

• Advocacy to combat stereotypes of the Latino/Hispanic community in media and entertainment as well as the opportunity to join in solidarity with the Latino/Hispanic acting community.


Application for regional memberships accepted by telephone order only. Call HOLA toll free at (888) 524-HOLA or (888) 524-4652. (VISA, MasterCard and American Express accepted.) Please submit your headshot (in .jpg format) and resume in a Word 
document or in Portable Data Format (.doc or .docx; or .pdf) via e-mail to HOLA.

Why Join HOLA? Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About HOLA


WHY JOIN HOLA?
Frequently Asked Questions

• Is HOLA an agency or management company?
No. While we work similarly to an agency or an artist management company, we do a lot more. In essence, HOLA is a membership organization, a not-for-profit arts service and advocacy organization that offers jobs and casting opportunities, workshops and seminars and special events to its membership.

• Does one have to audition for HOLA?
No. HOLA is a membership organization. Just pay the annual membership and you become an HOLA member.

• I am a new actor. Does HOLA apply to me and how so? (Or conversely, I have a fair amount of experience. How does HOLA apply to me?)
HOLA members range from the beginner to the established and everywhere in between. HOLA will apply to you at every stage of your career.

• Do I have to speak Spanish (or Portuguese) to be an HOLA member?
No. HOLA members speak English only, Spanish only, or both languages fluently. Our Brazilian members speak Portuguese as well as English. There is no requirement for any member to speak Spanish (or Portuguese) to be an HOLA member.

• What kind of casting notices do you receive?
HOLA receives all kinds of casting notices— from union and nonunion, through the disciplines of film, television, theater and voiceover. The majority of our notices are distributed to our membership. There are some instances, whether because of short notice or because of the search for something very specific, that HOLA makes referrals to certain talent.

• I have signed representation. Would that be in conflict with HOLA?
No. In fact, we would put your signed representative’s name and number on your online profile. It would be another way to promote yourself without conflict.

• If I book a job through HOLA, do I owe you a commission?
No. We are not an agency or artist management company. You are under no obligation to give us a commission. (But if you want to show your appreciation with a donation, we’ll be forced to take it, I suppose.)

• I am in the process of getting my citizenship. Could I still join HOLA?
Yes. As long as you can legally work in the U.S., you can join HOLA.

• Does HOLA have a social media presence?
Yes. We are on FacebookTwitter and have our own channel on YouTube. In addition, we are on Wikipedia and have our own blog, titled El Blog de HOLA.

• What if I am not an actor but I like what you do?
You could support HOLA by becoming a Friend of HOLA and donating to the organization. If you are a producer or director, a Friend of HOLA donation allow us to promote your productions!

All About Becoming an HOLA Member or a Friend of HOLA

Wanna be an HOLA member? Wanna know more about HOLA first?

HOLA
 is a not-for-profit arts service and advocacy organization founded in 1975.


HOLA members get their headshots and resumes on our web directory. In addition, HOLA receives casting notices from various sources that we pass on to our members (or in specific cases, help refer actors to the casting director).

HOLA offers low-cost workshops and seminars, professional counseling, special events and networking activities. We also produce the HOLA Awards which honor outstanding achievement by Latinos in entertainment.


HOLA has a Facebook page and a Twitter page in addition to this blog (imaginatively titled El Blog De HOLA). Whenever a member is doing a project, we can promote via e-mails we send out, through our Members in Performance page on the website or in El Blog on our HOLA Member Bochinche column (only good bochinche, never bad bochinche). It functions as another outlet to promote your work. HOLA is also on YouTube and on Wikipedia.

What if you are not an actor? You can support HOLA by being a Friend of HOLA. For more information, click here.

To become an HOLA member online (New York metropolitan area), fill out the member application form here.

Latinos Are Everywhere, Except On TV. What's Going On?

If the current rate of Latino involvement in the media were to play out as it has, it would take 60 years for Latinos in lead film roles to match their share of the U.S. population. It would take 100 years to do the same in TV. But even at that point, the Latino population would have already doubled.
Put more bluntly, if U.S. Latinos annexed themselves and founded their own country, they would comprise the 14th largest economy in the world, with $1.6 trillion in buying power.
Latinos make up 17 percent of the population. And they're young, about a decade younger than the average White American. They tune into radio more regularly. They buy movie tickets more often. So why are there so few Latinos still on TV and in film? 
Check out this article by J. Weston Shippen (with contributions from Janie Boschma) in the website of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP), which highlights Frances Negrón-Muntaner's report with Columbia University entitled The Latino Media Gap, by clicking here

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Journalist María Hinojosa and Her Role In Making The Invisible Visible

Former HOLA Awards honoree (and award-winning journalist) María Hinojosa spoke on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 at the first-ever Tedx Pennsylvania Avenue event in Washington, District of Columbia, where she spoke of her upbringing as part of a family of immigrants, not seeing herself at all in the media (as a result, growing up feeling "invisible" in the United States of America), and using her role as a journalist (through her production company The Futuro Media Group) and a professor to point the microphone at people whose voices were/are not heard and to tell the narratives that were/are not told– in essence, rendering the invisible now visible. To see her speech, click on the video below.